Posts tagged ‘viagra’

Boosting your libido naturally — guest post by HealthLine.com

English: Figs in Georgia

English: Figs in Georgia (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

If you feel that your libido isn’t what it used to be, you are not alone. Thousands of people suffer from a low libido but luckily there are a variety of things you can do to naturally boost your system. It’s not always easy to get excited about sex after working a nine-hour day, especially if you have children too. 

There are many people in the same situation that has to deal with this frustration. In some cases, a decrease in your libido may be due to a medical issue but, for many people, the situation may be remedied without medication, the natural way.

Aphrodisiacs: This could be fun! Certain foods like figs are supposed to give you a boost in the bedroom, almost like a love potion while others like bananas and avocados have a suggestive appearance.

 

Reduce your alcohol intake: one drink can reduce anxiety and help get you in the mood but because alcohol is a depressant, you can end up with the opposite effect.

 

Relieve stress: Women are particularly susceptible to the effects stress can have on one’s sex life, but men on the other hand, can sometimes use sex as a way to relieve stress, which can cause conflict.

 

Self-confidence: Nothing reduces your interest in sex more than low self-esteem. The way you feel about your body affects the way you feel about sex. Focus on your attributes rather than your flaws. This will give your self-esteem a boost.

 

Yohimbine: Yohimbine is an alkaloid found in the bark of the West African evergreen. This functions like a natural Viagra. Yohimbine bark can help you obtain and maintain an erection and enhances the quality of an erection.

 

Massage: Massage techniques can do wonders for sexual arousal particularly if you’re stressed, worried or angry. A little TLC may lead to something else…

 

Stay fit: In men body fat inhibits testosterone production. Belly fat also absorbs testosterone therefore it is very important to keep the weight down. You will have more stamina and the workouts will increase blood flow to the sex organs.

HealthLine.com is a popular resource that offers expert health advice from qualified professionals and experienced contributors. Find out more about heart health on Healthline.com.

 

 


 

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How to deal with impotence naturally — guest post by Catherine Howarth

Male impotence is a very difficult and often debilitating condition that not only affects the general well being of a person, but may also affect his attitude towards relationships and close personal bonds. This condition is typically characterized by a man’s inability to maintain an erection for any reasonable length of time, and in some severe cases, even the inability to have an erection despite arousal. Many men don’t realize that erection problems can be caused by a number of different factors ranging from physical debilities, underlying disease, stress, anxiety or even psychological troubles. One of the most common causes of erection problems found in men is an underlying case of heart disease, or diabetes.
Treating the problem 
Treating erectile dysfunction as an attempt to bolster self-confidence and allow a man to fully enjoy his special bond with a life-partner or significant other is usually done with the help of synthetic drugs such as Viagra. Unfortunately though, depending on synthetic drugs to help treat erectile dysfunction is not a permanent solution and can have detrimental side effects. Opting to treat erection problems naturally is a much better option and should be considered first.
Natural remedies
There are many herbs and herbal extracts that can greatly help to increase circulation to the penis or can bolster testosterone production, which can increase libido are usually employed to treat erection problems. Herbs such as gingko biloba, ashwaganda, horny goat’s weed, yohimbe, and of course, ginseng can prove to be beneficial for people suffering from embarrassing erection problems. These herbs contain natural compounds that are known to encourage the increased production of testosterone or an increase in circulatory efficiency, which makes it helpful for the management and eventual treatment of an erectile dysfunction.

Lifestyle changes
It should be noted however, that there is not any guarantees of instantaneous results from consuming any of these herbs and herbal supplements mentioned, although studies have been conducted as to their trace efficacy. Likewise, abiding by a good and healthy diet as well as avoiding stress, the over-consumption of synthetic, fatty and sugary foods as well as a moderate, if not total avoidance of, alcohol and tobacco have also been shown to contribute largely to the effective natural management of erectile dysfunction.

Being open to your significant other about your erection problems, along with keeping a positive attitude with regards to its eventual cure, will help to break away at the walls of insecurity. Such walls have been known to eat away at relationships and can help to surmount the often debilitating effects that erectile dysfunction can have over yourself and your significant other.

Catherine is a freelance writer and writes about male and female medical problems, such as erectile dysfunction and beauty. Catherine’s email is catherinehowarthwriter@gmail.com

Four popular prostate cancer myths — busted. Guest post by Bernice Spradlin

Telling fact from fiction is your first defense when it comes to prostate cancer.

Sure, you are growing your Mo (or mustache in support of November’s Prostate Cancer Awareness month) but do you know that prostate cancer is not just a disease that affects old dudes? No, most men afflicted are in their 50s. Did you also know that prostate cancer is the second most common type of cancer among men in the U.S.?

You might believe that you know enough about prostate cancer in order to recognize the signs and symptoms if they affected you or someone you love. However, doctors and cancer experts worry about the popular prostate cancer myths might negatively impact your awareness or decisions about taking pro-active decisions about your health. For instance:

Myth #1. Prostate cancer treatment causes impotence

Although it is a fact that 50% of all men who undergo prostate cancer treatment will experience problems with erectile dysfunction, it can be only temporary. A talk with your doctor will inform you on the risks and shed light on popular erectile dysfunction medications, like Cialis, Viagra and Levitra. These drugs don’t come cheap so purchasing Canadian drugs online at heavily discounted rates may be an option. Men that undergo surgery or radiation have experienced potency issues due to the damage to nerves and blood vessels (the same nerves and blood vessels that control erection), as well as lower sex drive due to hormone therapy. However the side effects of surgery, radiation and hormone therapy, typically subside within a year following treatment. Erectile-stimulating drugs can also be prescribed by your doctor until normal erectile function returns.

The risk: If a man believes he will have to live impotent as a result of prostate cancer, he may refuse treatment altogether and increase his risk of death when in actuality only 50% of men suffer erectile issues, temporarily in the 6 to 12 months following prostate cancer treatment.

Myth #2. Prostate cancer is a disease that affects elderly men only

Most people think that only senior men (65 years or older) are at risk for prostate cancer. That’s why when men in their 40s and 50s are diagnosed people think it’s rare or not common.

The risk: If a man believes that you have to be a senior to be at risk of prostate cancer, he may ignore the symptoms of the disease or think that he doesn’t have to worry and avoid or delay treatment if he’s diagnosed.

Myth #3. The symptoms of prostate cancer are obvious

Unfortunately, this is not the case. Prostate cancer in the early stages typically shows zero symptoms. The symptoms, most commonly urinary tract and back issues, become evident only when you are in the advanced stages of the disease and by then the cancer is treatable to prolong life, but no longer curable.

The risk: If you are only looking for the obvious symptoms, you may avoid annual prostate screens. That’s why awareness events like Movember exist, to remind men (aged 40 and up) to get their prostate specific antigen (PSA) blood levels checked annually.

Myth #4. People don’t die of prostate cancer

According to the National Cancer Institute, more than 240,000 American men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2011. Still, many men believe that no one man ever dies of prostate cancer.

The risk: The good news is that in most cases, if a doctor catches prostate cancer early on, it’s not only treatable, but curable. However, it’s still the second leading cancer killer for American men. Risk of death occurs if your doctor catches prostate cancer early on and you avoid treatment in belief that the disease can’t kill you.

Bernice Spradlin is an avid hiker and runner. She works at a gym in
Brooklyn, New York, where she gets great inspiration for her freelance
health-related articles and blogs. In her off time, you can often find
Bernice jogging the East River path along the waterfront and enjoying
the cool breeze. Bernice is currently looking for freelance writing
work, and can be contacted at BerniceG.Spradlin@gmail.com

Editor’s Note: If you’re interested in submitting a guest post, please click the “guest post” tab at the top of this blog’s main page. You’ll find submission guidelines. Facts, opinions, research and advice from our guest writers cannot substitute for a visit to your family physician.

 

 

 

Erectile Dysfunction: Always an awkward subject to talk about

OK, we giggle when see those erectile dysfunction medication commercials. An erection lasting more than four hours? What do we do? Do we brag or call the doctor? Actually, ED is an embarrassing problem that can lead to a break-down in marital communications.

Webmd has an article by Peter Jaret that provides valuable advice for men and women facing this threat to intimacy:

http://www.webmd.com/erectile-dysfunction/features/getting-intimate-talking-together-about-ed

The article quotes Brian Zamboni, a clinical psychologist at the University of Minnesota and California sex therapist Louanne Cole Weston. Before you get into panic mode, consider some of the great pieces of advice in this article, such as the need to find a comfortable way to approach the subject and, in some cases, taking a break from sex to focus on emotional intimacy.

The best piece of advice is to bring up the subject with your doctor. There are physical causes of ED, such as heart disease and diabetes. There’s also a great many treatment choices,  including medication and, in more challenging cases, penile implants.

While it’s way too easy to chuckle at Viagra, Cialis and Levitra ads, ED is a terribly frustrating condition. But there’s never a need to push the panic button. If the problem is not caused by stress, anger or anxiety, your doctor can offer treatment suggestions and start you on the road to a much more fulfilling sex life.

Book review: “A Guide to Men’s Health: Answers to Questions All Men Should Ask Their Doctor”

By Robert Corish, MD

Review by Scott Keith

Perhaps the day will arrive when men will become as “thorough” as women when it comes to seeing the family doctor. It seems women have a better grasp of the importance of getting screened for potentially life-threatening illnesses, such as breast and cervical cancer. Guys? It’s a different story.

A doctor, who lectures on preventive medicine and natural health and toxicology, has written a book aimed specifically at the stubborn guy – the man who would just as soon eat a sour lemon than schedule a visit with the MD. “A Guide to Men’s Health,” by Dr. Robert Corish, is a splendid fact-filled guide designed to help men see the importance of preventive health care.

Corish is blunt and straightforward in his presentation, yet sprinkles in just enough humor to loosen guys up, so they can learn how to pay better attention to their aches, pains and symptoms.

Corish took a somewhat wild career path. He made the transition from an environment of corner kicks, yellow cards and goal posts to the world of medicine, earning a medical doctorate at the University of Miami in Florida. In an interview with Men and Health: It’s a Guy Thing, Corish says he was a professional soccer player (Derby County) in England. He traveled to the United States to play for the North American Soccer League’s Fort Lauderdale Strikers. A career-ending injury changed everything. “I decided to go to school…I did my internship in internal medicine. I ended up in Chicago, where I did my residency in anesthesiology,” says Corish. Events propelled Corish to get board certified in toxicology, and he learned integrative, or functional medicine.

In writing the book, Corish takes note of the difference between men and women. He says men are fighters and breadwinners. “We don’t deal well with injuries…men tend to ignore things and hope things will just go away.” The problem is, adds Corish, as men get older, health problems accumulate. So Corish decided to take a few years off and write a book to address the stubborn male of our species.

Corish begins his book with the subject of aging. He writes, It’s important to understand that the aging process begins at the cellular level. He writes about foods that can help slow the aging process and points out that men demonstrate the least amount of knowledge about skin cancer and sun damage. Other topics touch on memory, mental sharpness, male menopause (yes, there is such a thing), heart health and sleep hygiene.

Men who avoid medical tests will get a crash course on preventive care after reading this book. Corish says, “Guys don’t like fingers put where they shouldn’t be…so they’re always fearful of the test…guys have a fear of bad news. They will avoid bad news. They don’t want to be told they have cancer or Alzheimer’s disease…denial is issue number one.” In particular, men get super squeamish over prostate exams. Chapter 5 makes prostate cancer much easier to understand. Explaining the much-feared digital rectal exam, Corish writes, Remember the finger wave never killed anybody, but cancer sure can. Compare this to what women have to go through…the discomfort of a pelvic and a rectal exam plus a pap smear scraping on a yearly basis starting at an early age. We have it much easier!

“A Guide to Men’s Health” tackles “touchier” subjects, such as hemorrhoids, hernias and erectile dysfunction. Corish writes, Viagra is a revolutionary drug that has unexpectedly changed the whole landscape of men’s health. Viagra, according to Corish, was originally a blood pressure medication. With Viagra, “men’s esteem (especially baby boomers) came back…they had a zest for life…they wanted to look better.” The “Viagra Phenomena,” as Corish calls it, played a huge role in getting men to want to take better care of themselves.

Added features in the book include a list of medical tests that men need to discuss with their primary care physicians. Corish stresses the importance of colorectal, prostate, blood pressure, skin, dental and eye examinations. At the end of the book, scan the entertaining Male Factoids. Among them: The average human dream lasts only 2 to 3 seconds . Laugh over Medical record blunders from doctor’s dictations and learn about Foods ranked most alkaline to most acidic.

Corish is optimistic about the future of men’s health. He says the tide is changing and men’s “health IQ’s” are improving. “The message is getting out there.”

Softcover, 196 pages, $16.99, Agape Publishing. The book is available at www. robertcorishmd.com.

Visit Dr. Corish at www.robertcorishmd.com

Book review: “The Intellectual Devotional: Health”

By David S. Kidder, Noah D. Oppenheim and Bruce K. Young, MD

Review by Scott Keith

Back in the day, if you loved medical trivia and wanted to research the causes of a fever or the health benefits of Vitamin C, you had to stroll to the nearest library or book store to satisfy your curiosity. All that changed with the Internet. A click of the mouse and you can research all things medical.

Thanks to the efforts of David S. Kidder, Noah D. Oppenheim and Bruce K.Young MD, you can find answers to many of your health questions the old-fashioned way, in an easy-to-carry-around book. The Intellectual Devotional: Health is the fourth installment in the New York Times best-selling series. This enjoyable 374-page book will let you explore seven fields of knowledge: Children and Adolescents, Diseases and Ailments, Lifestyle and Preventive Medicine, Drugs and Alternative Treatments, The Mind, Sexuality and Reproduction and Medical Milestones. What is remarkable about this lively, instructional book is that topics are designed to be read one day at a time. For instance, Monday, Day 1, you’re introduced to the Apgar Score. Tuesday, Day 2, is devoted to Immunity.

All age groups can benefit from this treasure trove of medical facts. The older crowd can explore Memory and learn that “The gray matter that makes up the brain’s wrinkly outer cerebral cortex is filled with memories, much as a computer disk is full of files, waiting to be activated and pulled back into the conscious thought process.” Later in the book, on the subject Nearsightedness, read that “Some accounts claim that the Roman emperor Nero (AD 37-68) would gaze through an emerald in order to see gladiator fights more clearly. Nero’s jewel is believed to be one of the earliest remedies for nearsightedness, a common vision condition in which one can see nearby objects clearly but things that are farther away appear blurry.”

The Intellectual Devotional: Health is useful on many levels. As a self-help guide, you’ll discover that “exercise can improve or even prevent medical conditions such as diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke, and some cancers.” If you have a desire to shed a few pounds, take note that “Research has shown that people who maintained a Mediterranean-style diet lost more weight over a 2-year period than people who followed either a high-protein or a low-fat diet.”

If trivia is your thing, learn about the first ambulance or study medical legends such as Hippocrates, Van Leeuwenhoek, William Harvey, Edward Jenner and Louis Pasteur. Discover the history behind medications such as Tetracycline, Valium, Nexium, and perhaps the granddaddy of modern pills, Viagra. And check out Additional Facts at the bottom of each page. This feature offers fun-to-read health tips, sprinkled with a bit more history.

Whether you’re a youngster, a baby boomer or a senior citizen, you’ll have a fun time reading The Intellectual Devotional: Health one day, one topic, at a time. If you prefer to read several topics at one sitting, be sure to schedule a large chunk of time because you’re not going to want to put this book down. 

(Rodale, Hardcover, $24.00)

Available at Amazon.com, all major book stores, Target, Costco and Walmart

www.theintellectualdevotional.com

Erectile Dysfunction: Are pills always the answer?

No baby boomer men’s health blog can be complete without a discussion about Erectile Dysfunction, commonly known as E.D. You’ve seen the advertisements. A happy middle-aged couple discover that a little pill can turn a humdrum day into a wild, passionate adventure.

Back in the day, it seemed as if you only saw television ads for soda pop, fast food, toiletries, beer and breakfast cereal. Now, it’s hard to get through an hour of T.V. without seeing Viagra, Cialis and Levitra commercials. And who can say they didn’t giggle the first time they heard an announcer mention that you need to seek medical attention if an erection lasts longer than four hours.

Lesley Alderman has a story in the New York Times describing treatment options for a disorder that is more common after a baby boomer reaches his mid-60s:

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/29/health/29patient.html?_r=1&ref=health

What is worth noticing in this story is that lifestyle changes may help restore a man’s sexual ability. Perhaps E.D. presents a good opportunity to lose weight, exercise and pick more healthful foods. It’s worth a try. You can always choose medication, as long as you have a good, honest talk with your doctor.